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Checking electrical components.

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  • Checking electrical components.

    I could have swore that I saw a site that listed all of our sensors and sending units and how to check them with a multimeter. I also thought I had book marked it, but now I can't find it. (or maybe I just dreamed it after on of my 3 a.m., 6 hour, researching junk sessions.)

    Either way I'm replacing my water pump and went ahead and pulled my oil pressure sending unit to check it while I was at it. It hasn't worked since I bought the Jeep, and that really bothers me. If I remember correctly this same site also listed a way to check the wiring harness between the unit and gauge. If someone could point me in the right direction I'd appreciate it.

    Thanx. York.
    2005 Wrangler Rubicon.
    1989 Jeep Cherokee. Wrecked (soon to be ressurected)
    1953 M38A1 in need of resto.
    1947 CJ2A in need of resto.
    1988 Jeep Grand Wagoneer "Brutus." 360, TF 727, NP 229, 4.10s, and 3 GPM .

  • #2
    bump
    2005 Wrangler Rubicon.
    1989 Jeep Cherokee. Wrecked (soon to be ressurected)
    1953 M38A1 in need of resto.
    1947 CJ2A in need of resto.
    1988 Jeep Grand Wagoneer "Brutus." 360, TF 727, NP 229, 4.10s, and 3 GPM .

    Comment


    • #3
      Pull the wire harness lead off of the oil sensor, and put an ohmmeter on it.

      With the engine off, it should read a low resistance... something like 30-50 ohms.

      When the engine is running, it will read higher, something like 200 ohms or so (been a long time since I checked).

      Or stop by the local auto parts store and put a meter on their oil pressure sendor for your vehicle. You will at least have a good reading at the low oil pressure side (like with the engine off) and you can compare the two sensor readings.

      Or, go to Radio Shack and buy a couple of cheap resistors in the 75-ohm, 150-Ohm, 200-Ohm and 250-Ohm range and wrap the leads around the sensor connection point start the engine and see which resistor give you 80PSI readings... that will tell you the sensor range in resistance.

      And...no, at this particular point my Jeep wiring harness is in need of repair, and I cannot at this time go out and measure it for you...

      Some help from the collective here? Anyone got a running AMC-360 and a meter?
      Joe Guilbeau<br />1983 Cherokee Laredo WT (SJ-17), 360/229/727/D44/D60 4.10 Gearing, 8-lug hubs, Edelbrock Performer w/EGR Intake, Mallory Unilite Series 47 Photo-Optic Infrared Trigger Vacuum Distributor, Mallory Surge Protector, Mallory Promaster Coil, Holley Pro-Jection TBI 502-Analog, FlowKooler High Output Water Pump, Staggered 4-Core Custom Industrial Radiator, HD Fan Clutch, Dual Electric Fans, CS130 Delco 105-Amp Alternator, Oil Bypass Mods at Rear of Block and Distributor Oiling, Superlift 4\" Suspension, Rancho RS5000\'s, Hi-Tech 31\" Re-Treads, Aero 33 Gal Tank w/Skid Plate, Custom Rear \"Longhorn\" Bumper

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      • #4
        Thank you I hate electrical repairs (I guess I picked the wrong brand of vehicles to fall in love with, cause I haven't owned a Jeep yet that didn't have some form of electrical gremlin), I wish I had book marked that web page, it had the ohms readings for all the sensors on our Jeeps.
        2005 Wrangler Rubicon.
        1989 Jeep Cherokee. Wrecked (soon to be ressurected)
        1953 M38A1 in need of resto.
        1947 CJ2A in need of resto.
        1988 Jeep Grand Wagoneer "Brutus." 360, TF 727, NP 229, 4.10s, and 3 GPM .

        Comment

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