International Full Size Jeep Association
Home Forums Reader's Rigs Tech Library Trail Stories FSJ-List
International Full Size Jeep Association  

Go Back   International Full Size Jeep Association > Tire Kickin' > General FSJ Tech

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-16-2010, 01:58 PM
Billygoat's Avatar
Billygoat Billygoat is offline
Bleedin' Gasoline
 
Join Date: Mar 16, 2004
Location: Southwest Wisconsin
Posts: 2,493
Rear Wheel Bearing replacment How To

I had to replace my rear wheel bearings in Gonzo, so I thought I would try to do a write up for others. Shown is a model 20 rear end, dana 44 axle is the same parts, just different sizes.

Keep in mind that the axle is held in by the bearing retainer plate and if the bearing fails catastrophically then the axle (along with the wheel) can leave the vehicle; this has happened to a few forum members. If you are unsure if you have a bearing going bad you should inspect them, and you should repack the bearings with grease – how often depends on use.

A growling noise when you drive is a good indicator of a bad bearing, also when the truck is jacked up check for play at the rear wheel, just a little in/out is ok, about enough just to feel, any more or side to side and you need to replace the bearing.

You can get the bearing kit and seal from a parts store, but the retaining plates are hard to find….BJ’s sells a complete kit, and at a great price, that is where I got mine.

It is a pretty basic process to remove the bearing for inspection/replacement.
Jack up the truck, support on jack stands, remove the wheel, then the brake drum.
My pass side drum was rust froze to the center hub, I hit it with some PB blaster and a few whacks with the hammer and it popped off. If your shoes hang up you may need to back them off manually.
There is an oval hole on the back of the drum – you may have to knock out a steel plug, it is the rearmost plug (the backing plate is for either side) inside the hole you see a star wheel – from the back up is tighter down is losser.

Once you get the drum off you see this



Then pencil is pointing out the access holes that you use to get to the nuts.
On the Model 20 you can leave the brake parts in place, I took them out thinking they would help with the pictures, and my retaining pin was broken anyway.



The shaft will probably not want to come right out, try hitting the back of the hub with a dead blow or prying on it with a block across the shoes.

One the shaft is out you see this:



A = Lock Ring
B = Inner Race/cone
C = Outer Seal
D = Retaining Plate.

Left in the Axle Tube is:



A = Outer Race
B = Inner Seal

At this point check the rollers and the outer race for pits, groves and other sings of wear.
If everything looks ok, you can repack the bearing with grease and put it back together.
If not you will need a couple special tools to go farther, or call some shops and get prices on the labor to remove the old bearing and press on the new one.

Here is how I take the old stuff off – I call it the old farmer method and it does involve some risk – others may have suggestions on a different method. I take no responsibility for anyone’s actions attempting to follow this procedure and resulting in damage to themselves or there vehicle.

First push the seal and retaining plate back to the hub then use an air cutting wheel to cut thru the outer race retainer and roller cage.



Then you can pry them open and remove them.
Now if this is the first time you try this, wrap duct tape on the shaft surfaces to protect it from nicks. Cut the lock ring until it there is about 1/16” thickness left – both mine snapped at this point – if not use the same method as the inner race.



Then cut the inner race until there is about 1/16” left – BE CAREFULL it buts up to the seal area and any nicks will result in a less ideal seal surface. Then support the inner race on a solid surface, and put a chisel in the cut, a couple whacks with a hammer and it will split the rest of the way through, then it can be easily slid off.
Save the inner race – the seal and retaining plate can now be removed, and clean the shaft up. You might be able to use a right angle grinder with cut off wheel instead of an air cut off tool, but I don’t recommend it, they are to large (less precise) and harder to control increasing the chance of damage.



Slide the retaining plate on then the new outer seal – with the metal face toward the hub.
Then slide the bearing up to the bearing area – be sure to have it the correct way with the outer race lock ring toward the hub face, then slide on the old inner race and put in a press – the other special tool you need – I would not try this with out a press.
Using the old inner race guarantees that you are putting pressure on the new inner race, put pressure on the outer race and you will destroy the new bearing...



Then slice on the bearing retaining collar and again use the old inner race as a driver in the press. Do not try to press them both on at the same time – it will not work.



The outer race is slip fit in the housing – on the outer race lock ring that stays on the inner race/cone assembly is press fit; otherwise you would never get it apart.
There may be some rust right on the outer edge that fights you on sliding the race out, hit it with some emery paper, a slide hammer may help, I use a small pry bar.



Use a small ended drift to drive into the edge of the inner seal, it will deform, tip and can be pulled out easily.



There is a lot of debate on if you need/want the inner seal, even among the engineers and some years didn’t have them, I think you should use them, so after you wipe all the old grease out you can tap the new seal in, - be sure to coat the inside of the seal with grease - a wood dowel works well, I use a wide face drift, keep it to the outside edge, moving in a circular motion as you tap it, to much force and you will ruin it.



When I say tap I mean tap, this is how I hold the hammer and the distance I stroke it from the drift end.



Pack the bearing with grease, but sure to coat seal with grease too.



Slide the assembly back in, torque the bolts to ____ft/lb in a criss cross pattern.

Put the break drum and wheel back on – adjust you brakes up if you need to and you are done!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-16-2010, 03:01 PM
fulsizjeep's Avatar
fulsizjeep fulsizjeep is offline
Señor Jackhead
 
Join Date: Aug 21, 2002
Location: Jubilee Jeeps.SWCO
Posts: 22,239
Nice Work! Thanks!
This project for a Dana 44 rear axle is identical except that some D44s do not use the inner seal. I broke down and bought a slide hammer for pulling the axle shaft.
__________________
Flint
Ran when parked.
http://jubileejeeps.org/quadratrac
88 GW, 401/727/208, 5" lift, D44s/4.10s/locked up, 35s and a few Evil Twin mods, http://eviltwinfab.com and a few TT's Fabworks mods, http://www.ttsfabworks.com
76 401 Wag, 77 401 Wag, 77 401 J20
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-16-2010, 07:56 PM
The Colonel's Avatar
The Colonel The Colonel is offline
FSJ Maniac
 
Join Date: Feb 21, 2010
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 2,842
Nice write-up

Yes, the Dana 44's without the inner seal are lubricated by the gear oil and not greased.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-16-2010, 08:12 PM
HOOT's Avatar
HOOT HOOT is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 28, 2003
Location: Taylor Mill,KY 41015
Posts: 5,586
I bought the last two model 20 shafts BJ's had for my old waggy. Previous owner scarred the shafts bad when he cut off the old retaining ring and bearings. He never drove it again because of the grease and oil running out onto his brakes shoes.

Nice write up and pics.

For those of you not using the inner seal remmeber to pack your bearings when you replace them. otherwise they will run dry until the axle oil gets to them.
__________________
Tom Gibson
1980 J20 Utility bed truck. Factory cab and chassis truck.
1981 J-20 "RED" 360/727/208,R.I.P. Undergoing major retrofit to be a 1980 Utility truck.Now being parted out.
1977 Honcho "Blue" 401/400/quad. Under going major upgrades.."This is Not Your Fathers Honcho", it may not even be a Honcho anymore when done.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-16-2010, 10:33 PM
Dirt Wag's Avatar
Dirt Wag Dirt Wag is offline
Grease Monkey
 
Join Date: Jun 24, 2008
Location: Lehigh Acres, FL, USA
Posts: 358
Nice write up! Thank you. This will come in handy next week when we plan to do a rear disc conversion. Might as well do the bearings/seals too since one side is leaking.
__________________
1985 GW, 360, 727, NP229, D44, AMC20, HEI, SOA/shackle flip 7" lift, Quick Lok locker rear, Aussie Locker front, 4.10 gears, 37 X 13.5 Interco SS-M16's, Warn Premium hubs, Tuff Stuff 12,000 LB winch, rear disc brakes === stripped down street legal off road toy
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-17-2010, 05:44 AM
Billygoat's Avatar
Billygoat Billygoat is offline
Bleedin' Gasoline
 
Join Date: Mar 16, 2004
Location: Southwest Wisconsin
Posts: 2,493
Quote:
Originally Posted by HOOT
Previous owner scarred the shafts bad when he cut off the old retaining ring and bearings. He never drove it again because of the grease and oil running out onto his brakes shoes.

That is the risk when you cut the old stuff off, I am waiting to see if someone has another method to remove them... I have a bearing remover, but with the hub on 1 side and the length of shaft on the other can not figure out how to pull or push on it.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-17-2010, 07:54 AM
The Colonel's Avatar
The Colonel The Colonel is offline
FSJ Maniac
 
Join Date: Feb 21, 2010
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 2,842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billygoat
That is the risk when you cut the old stuff off, I am waiting to see if someone has another method to remove them... I have a bearing remover, but with the hub on 1 side and the length of shaft on the other can not figure out how to pull or push on it.

The Dana 44 service manual says to drill a hole in the retainer (don't drill too deep and hit the axle) and then cold crack it with a chisel.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-18-2010, 08:13 AM
KJ Ryu's Avatar
KJ Ryu KJ Ryu is offline
Master Mechanic
 
Join Date: Sep 06, 2008
Location: Casper, WY
Posts: 771
It wouldn't be very cheap but a good carbide end-mill should cut through it like butter, if you have a mill or good drill press.
__________________
Ron

2005 KJ, Hit-n-Run, 2am 6-17-2012, Totaled.
1977 J10, 2v304, T18, D20, 37x14s, SOA & SF on tons, still ugly Occasional driving!
1978 SJ Wagoneer, 360, QT, 33x12.5s, lift by Sawzall NOT Running
1977 J10 4v401, TH400, BW1339, mostly stock DD

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mars
One man's trans leak is another's penetrating oil
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-19-2010, 06:44 PM
swampedge's Avatar
swampedge swampedge is offline
258 I6
 
Join Date: Oct 07, 2007
Location: Melbourne Florida
Posts: 433
The easiest way to do it at home is to take a piece of pipe and weld a plate on one end with a hole in the middle big enough for the axle to pass through and 1" nut welded to the other. Drill holes in the plate to attach to a bearing splitter. Now put bearing splitter on to axle, slide this neat tool you just made over the axle shaft and bolt it to the splitter. Impact wrench on bolt threaded through the nut you welded to the other end of your tool and crank on it. It will take the bearing off most of the time. Easy!
__________________
1970 Gladiator with a 350, a/c and a PTO winch.

You really are judged by the dogs you have!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-16-2019, 11:24 AM
letank's Avatar
letank letank is offline
AMC 4 OH! 1
 
Join Date: Jun 03, 2002
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 3,822
BTT,

thank you, the local guy passed away, so I am going to have to do it myself...

and need to figure out how to get the right size for the dana 44
__________________
Michel
74 wag, 349Kmiles on original ticker/trany, except for the rust. Will it make it to the next get together without a rebuilt? Status: needs a new body.
85 Gwag, 226 Kmiles. $250 FSJ test lab since 02, that refuses to give up but still leaks.

See Ouray 2013, Engine bits and Fuel and brake lines, and Body work

Last edited by letank : 04-16-2019 at 11:30 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 04-18-2019, 01:27 AM
FSJunkie's Avatar
FSJunkie FSJunkie is offline
The Nigel Tufnel of the FSJ world.
 
Join Date: Jan 09, 2011
Location: Not The Hot Part, Arizona
Posts: 3,954
Some Dana 44's use an inner wheel bearing seal. Mine did. Early production, I suppose. The outer seal is a different style too. It's interesting that the original D44 and M20 bearings were tapered roller but the new replacements are not.

This Jeep M20 wheel bearing design is totally different from the wheel bearing design on AMC car M20 which uses two piece axles with a removable hub.
__________________
'72 Jeep Wagoneer Custom, 360 V8

I love how arguements end as soon as Ristow comments. Ristow is right...again.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 04-18-2019, 06:14 AM
Tanker Tanker is offline
350 Buick
 
Join Date: Jan 04, 2005
Location: NC
Posts: 837
Just to add BetterScoutParts sells a heavy duty retaining plate. As for greasing the bearings I've heard that some people have drill an taped between the seals. One tap was at the 1000 clock the other opposite,one got a grease nipple the other a plug. Just a thought to look up.
__________________
Owner of Jakes FSJ Junkyard 91 Jeep Cherokee /2006 3500 Dodge AKA Babe the big blue puller
Hire the handicapped, they are fun watch!
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 04-18-2019, 10:06 AM
letank's Avatar
letank letank is offline
AMC 4 OH! 1
 
Join Date: Jun 03, 2002
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 3,822
Went to the better parts place that has a in-house machine shop... well it is a repair shop. The counter guy which has been there for over 25 years, punched his computer for specs, he had the parts, the new part has a built in race. Picked up the axle latter and could specs my removed race to the new all inclusive bearing unit, it specs perfect, no problem sliding the axle back, yes it is tight. Noise seems to be gone.


Forgot to say that it is a Dana 44 on an 86, and yes the outer bearing, no inner seal, and removing the race was a bit challenging, at some point you are wedging the seal remover tool on the opposite side for the race, so I laid a wrench on the hub to allow the race to move freely when it is slipped out


Also, I did not need to remove the brake shoes and brake hardware


thank you for the knowledge
__________________
Michel
74 wag, 349Kmiles on original ticker/trany, except for the rust. Will it make it to the next get together without a rebuilt? Status: needs a new body.
85 Gwag, 226 Kmiles. $250 FSJ test lab since 02, that refuses to give up but still leaks.

See Ouray 2013, Engine bits and Fuel and brake lines, and Body work

Last edited by letank : 04-18-2019 at 10:12 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rear D44: Bad Pinion Bearing bfroe General FSJ Tech 3 07-02-2010 09:38 PM
The rear wheel bearing going feels like??? duncanstives General FSJ Tech 10 04-28-2009 10:44 PM
N/T rear wheel opening idea with pics JeepNOFEAR General FSJ Discussion 6 03-17-2007 08:16 PM
GW Wheel Bearing, Spindle Bearing, Rotor Replacement - Information (Many Pictures) Kevin718 Drivetrain 20 09-24-2006 09:01 PM
Rear Wheel Bearings ???????? Crazy_Jeepman General FSJ Tech 9 07-30-2001 07:43 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
corner corner